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Striped Skunk

 

If you seem to smell a very distinct and dissatisfying smell, you may have encountered a nearby skunk. Striped skunks can be found in pretty much every county of Wisconsin. They will eat pretty much anything so the chances of having one in your own backyard are high. Try not to encounter a striped skunk unless it's absolutely necessary. They will give you a scent that's not easy to get rid of. Besides knowing that their cute looks can be deceiving, did you know that the striped skunk is actually a member of the weasel family? That is only one of many interesting facts about skunks.

When it comes to predators, the striped skunk is one of the luckiest animals out there. This skunk is lucky enough to have two main predators. The only ones brave enough to encounter this smell inhabiting creature are the great horned owls and the barred owls. Most other animals are smart enough not to bother the skunk. You get a break from looking out for skunks during the freezing times of the year. The striped skunk will spend most of its time in dens underground to keep warm. Even though it bears an unfortunate downfall to others, the striped skunk is an amazing creature that deserves any attention it gets.

 

Name: Striped Skunk

Scientific Name: Mephitis mephitis

Measurements: length: 22-32in, tail length: 8-12in, weight: 4-9lbs

Habitat: farmland, wooded areas, brush along streams and ditches.

Diet: bees, crickets, grasshoppers, worms, mice, rats, squirrels, vegetables.

Behavior: spray bad smelling musk for defense, nocturnal, don't hibernate, not that aggressive.

Reproduction: young born between May and June, 6 or 7 babies, mating February-march.

Predators: great horned owl, barred owls, vehicles

Life Expectancy: N/A

Extra Facts: people can smell skunk musk from a mile away; can spray 15ft, closely related to spotted skunk.

Part of Wisconsin it generally resides: all over in Wisconsin

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